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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 89 (some duplicates have been removed)
for their kids. >> today, pentagon officials said furloughs among their civilian employees would not start until late april. as for daycare -- >> how do you back up tens of thousands of parents will search for child care immediately >> look, whether that search begins on march 1 or in the near future, the impact on the economy and on people's lives is real. >> indeed, defense officials also said today especially if it did not start right away, not only will the jobs be furloughed, all civilian pay will be cut by 20%. one reason white house aides say they have the upper hand over speaker john boehner and the conservatives seem to agree. boehner had an op-ed blasting the president for not coming up with a solution. the republican declared the cuts will be deep writing a week from now, a dramatic new federal policy is set to go in to effect that threatens the u.s. national security. thousands of jobs and more. conservative journalist byron york responding to the op-ed noting that boehner has uncomfortable position. adding why would boehner adopt the democratic description of the cut as deep when it
's oil flows. lawmakers have until march the 1st to cut $500 billion from the pentagon's budget over the next decade. if they don't automatic cuts kick. in with that dangling overhead the military has had its hands tied they tell us. jennifer pentagon -- griffin is at the pentagon tonight. i know they want more money. >> that's right. it is significant in terms of the message that it sends to iran right now in a very tense time in the middle east. but it is and it is the first concrete sign that the budget uncertainty is going to have a real impact on national security. at a time when tensions are are high with iran over its nuclear program and negotiations might be coming soon, the u.s. had had a policy of having two aircraft carriers over the golf for the past two years. the uss eisenhower will deploy later this month. but it will go alone we're told to replace the uss. according to george little said facing budget uncertainty continuing budget resolution and across the board sequestration cuts made this request to the secretary and he approved. secretary of defense approved to rev
. we will be live from pentagon in a minute. >>> and falling from space, wow, pretty cool, at a rate of more than 843 miles per hour, that's how fast dare devil felix baumgartner fell when he jumped from space. the official speed has been released. even faster now than those record keepers thought at first. pretty cool stuff. >>> one of our top stories today at cnn, a secret american drone base somewhere in saudi arabia, now this is according, these are reports from two major newspapers today, saying that this u.s. launches these drone attacks against al qaeda targets from that particular base. i want to bring in two folks here at the pentagon chris lawrence also michael holmes from cnn international. chris, it's not a total surprise that this was there in saudi arabia, but certainly it was not something that they officially wanted to reveal. why are they doing it now? >> that's the big question, suzanne, why did this come out? we reported two years ago from our sources u.s. officials were telling us the cia was building an airstrip in the a arabian peninsula. it was hinted it would
limiting military pay increases which effectively decreases troop's salaries. our pentagon correspondent barbara starr's got the details. barbara, what's going on? >> you know, wolf, here in washington, nothing can be more sensitive than pay for america's armed forces, but the troops are looking at being caught right in the middle of it all. >> thank you, sir. >> reporter: the troops usually are happy to see defense secretary panetta, smiles and handshakes all around. but days before he leaves office, panetta has bad news. he's proposing less money in their paycheck next year. panetta, a savvy washington operative in budget politics, is leaving it to congress to figure out how not to cut pay and keep thousands of defense employees on the job. >> we will furlough as many as 800,000 dod civilians around the country for up to 22 days. they could face a 20% cut in their salary. don't think that's going to impact on our economy? >> reporter: the recommendation to slow the military pay raise will put troops in the middle of that political fight between congress and the president over spending.
is virginia home to the pentagon, the world's largest u.s. navy base, but a hub for major defense contractors such as aircraft builders. so the impact over 200,000 jobs, second only to california. you can't want this automatic spending cut to go forward. >> you know, clearly this is not, david, the best way to go about trying to chroontrol spending. and we have demonstrated in the house two separate occasions -- one of the bills we put across the floor and passed i was the sponsor of for that reason. these are indiscriminate cuts. we can do a lot better. what i hope to be able to hear from the president in the state of the union is he wants to join us in trying to effect much smarter cuts in spending. >> but that's what he's saying. >> we don't have to have the impact that you just described. >> why not work with him on short-term measure which he is talking about to delay this, find a different way to go about some of the cuts? >> the problem is, david, every time you turn around the answer is to raise taxes. and, you know, he just got his tax hike on the wealthy. and you can't in this town
home to the pentagon, the largest navy base in norfolk, it's a hub for defense contractors, such as aircraft carrier builders, nondefense budget cuts would eliminate another 71,000-plus jobs in virginia. so, the impact over 200,000 jobs, second only to california. you can't want this automatic spending cut to go forward. >> you know, clearly, this is not, david, the best way to go about trying to control spending, and we have demonstrated in the house for two separate occasions. one of the bills that we put across the floor that passed i was a sponsor of for exactly that reason. these are indiscriminate cuts. we can do a lot better. and what i hope to be able to hear from the president in the state of the union is he wants to join us in trying to effect much smarter cuts in spending so we don't have to have -- >> but that's what he's saying. >> so we don't have to have the impact that you discussed. >> why not work with him on some short-term measure that he's talking about to delay this, try to find a different way to go about these cuts? >> the problem is, david, every ti
to the staff at the pentagon since taking office early this morning. hagel was sworn in at a private ceremony after an unusually tough confirmation fight, which ended in a 58-41 vote. hagel overcame a republican-led filibuster by members of his own party who never forgave his criticism of the iraq war. let me bring in republican strategist and former santorum senior strategist and nbc col n columnist and contributing editor for the hill. good morning. he has to confront a staggering $46 billion in cuts to military spending which are set to begin tomorrow. he's got his work cut out for him. >> he really does. part of the reason the president selected chuck hagel was knowing going forward the defense department would have to undergo cuts anyhow. obviously the sequester makes that a lot tougher process because it is, you know, these cuts are much less strategic obviously than what we would have preferred. he also comes in after having a tough few weeks, a little bloodied i think and some of that was intended not so much to go after hagel but to try to go after the president and, thankfully, the
panetta spoke at a pentagon farewell ceremony. he talked about north korea and called on congress to end the uncertainty posed by pending budget cuts known as sequestration. mr. panetta will stay in his position until his successor is confirmed. president obama has nominated former senator chuck hagel to be his replacement. this is half an hour. [applause] >> halt. present. halt. ♪ o say can you see by the dawn's early light snule what so -- what so proudly we hailed at the twilight's last gleaming whose broad stripes and bright stars through the perilous fight o'er the ramparts we watched were so gallantly streaming and the rockets red glare the bombs bursting in air gave proof through the night that our flag was still there o say does that star spangled banner yet wave oaer the land of the free and the home of the brave ♪ >> please be seated. >> ladies and gentlemen, the director of administration and management, mr. michael rhodes. >> well, welcome, everybody. thank you very much for being here today. as we have an opportunity for the secretary's farewell address to the pentagon c
are to buy the pentagon didn't show you any video of things that miss. that is bad pr. and the percentage of weapons that were smart weapons in the first gulf war but infinitely more than anything the iraqis had was remarkably small compared to the impression the pentagon gave them a military briefing for the alicia pictures of smart bombs and smart missiles and things fly into windows. that was the percentage actually expended. so i don't think this is a revolution in military affairs so much as a vivid demonstration of just how proficient the united states was in waging war, especially can do this proficient adversary. but it also is a military affairs in a fundamentalist about is the car still has a boat here and the ultimate goal of the conflict was a political goal and therefore the military plan made that involve smart and weapons were designed with a traditional military conclusion, which in truth is not revolutionary at all, getting the enemy to do what she wanted. i can't see it as fares. and getting assigned from the back right of time, but i do want to give -- >> yet, let randy
years, the pentagon said it can't afford to keep two aircraft carriers in the persian gulf. the u.s.s. truman would have left today from norfolk, virginia. defense secretary leon panetta blamed the cut back on is he quest ration saying if congress can't rewrite the law, things get worse. >> instead of being a first-rate power in the world, we turn into a second-rate power. that would be the result of sequester. >> you won't find this chairman arguing we need to do more with less. you'll find me arguing if that happens, we need to do less with less. >> russia will surpass u.s. defense spending in terms of overall percent of gdp in just two years. china is slated to overtake the u.s. in 2035. >> we've seen double digit increase s in chinese defense spending for more than 15 years now, and that really should not only give pause to the united states but it really should be a source of concern for the countries in the region as well. >> reporter: two years ago, then defense secretary robert gates brow beat nato allies to spent two percent of their gdp on defense. when france wanted to
anything at all from any of our troops on the front lines but to say that in the entire pentagon budget there isn't an iota of room for cuts like this for meaningful cuts would be lying. >> this is significant. you have republicans saying the pentagon budget can be cut without jeopardizing national security. not all of them. you have people like john mccain -- describe the fall but a lot of republicans, privately and publicly, saying that there is room to cut the -- >> as long as you don't -- as long as you hold harmless with everything that deals with troop readiness, that deals with troops on the front lines and military families but there's plenty of room in the procurement budgets, there's plenty of room for reforms and for -- >> i want to come to that in a second, but the problem will be, i think for the white house, broadly and for the country is the point that congressman ellison makes, you hit the sequester right now, that is goign to have a real economic impact right away. >> absolutely, absolutely, and i think you'll hear the president most likely talk about that on tuesday ni
live with those cutbacks to the pentagon. so isn't there a spending problem here that must be addressed? >> absolutely. and i believe as chairman of the defense appropriations subcommittee and in the senate that we can save money, cut waste in the pentagon, and not compromise our national security. but to do this in such a haphazard way over the remaining six or seven months is going to be unfair to the military and our families. think about this for a second. cutting back on psychological counseling for the members of the military and their family during the remainder of this year when we have this grievous problem of suicides in the military and readjustment when they come home from battle. we can't do that. >> but isn't there always a reason to spend the money in washington? >> no. >> can't you always find a reason not to cut? isn't this the republican argument that at least here, if worse comes to worse and the sequester happens, we'll at least get spending cuts. how else to force the president's hand? >> do we really want to base our spending cuts reducing medical research in ameri
's a constitutional duty, however, the pentagon should be audited. some estimated 25 billion in savings by auditing it. i'm for it. even on the sequester talk about 800,000 civilians are going to be laid off from the pentagon. i don't believe it because the pentagon is increasing their budget as a result of this. in terms of real dollars. let me ask you this, i see four senate stars, you're one of them. and you, marco, ted cruz and mike lee seem to be the strong conservative voices that i look to to bring some sanity back to washington. now, are you all friends. >> yep, we have lunch together a couple times a week. >> and and with the whole crew and we eat together and we get along and work on different issues together and i see a lot of the freshness being new members in the senate, and the system beats you down and that's why i'm a big believer in term limits. we need more rollover, more turnover because after you've been there for a while it's hard to have the energy it takes to combat government, it's hard to combat that government. >> a lot of speculation, you might run for president. >> i know i
, where the revolutionary war ended, an poe matter,to where the civil war ended, the pentagon where we were attacked on 9/11. we are the most connected, one in eight virgin islands is a veteran. not one in eight adults, but from birth to death. over 100,000 active duty, guard and reserve, d.o.d. civilians, d.o.d. contractors. by the time you add all those up and their families, military families we're probably talking about one in three virginians. so i went to the places where virginians work every day, as ship repairs and private shipyards, active duty on naval bases, as d.o.d. civilians working as nurseness army hospitals, as young officer candidates training in rotc programs, at v.a. hospitals. i went around the state and let me tell you what i heard. a few miles from here, fort belvoir, one of the preeminent institutions that treats wounded warriors. a wounded warrior still on active service being treated there, wife sitting right next to him, we talked and she ventured this, let's talk about these furloughs of these d.o.d. civilian employees. my -- my husband's nurses are all d.o
? >> at the pentagon. >> this is the first time hearing of this. when did this happen? did they make this decision on the cruise ship? >> no. no, they didn't. it actually happened in washington. >> really? that's fascinating. >> which is its own permanent port-a-potty. >> okay. mika, for those of us that were just sitting there looking at a cruise ship for 24 hours instead of following the real news, why don't you catch us up with what actually happened yesterday in the news. >> republicans blocked a vote yesterday that would have ended the debate and allowed for a final decision one way or another. democrats fell just shy of the votes needed to advance the process. something president obama chalked up to partisan politics. >> there's nothing in the constitution that says that somebody should get 60 votes. there are only a handful of instances in which there's been any kind of filibuster of anybody for a cabinet position in our history. and what seems to be happening -- and this has been growing over time -- is the republican minority in the senate seem to think that the rule now is that you have
on capitol hill right now on the a hearing for the benghazi terror attack where he addressed the pentagon's response to the assault on our consulate on september 11th. four americans, including our ambassador to libya, died in that attack. this comes just a day after mr. panetta emotionally charged parting speech to students at georgetown university where he blasted the massive defense cuts known as the sequester, set to go into effect just weeks from now. >> if sequester happens, let me tell you some of the results. we will furlough as many as 800,000 dod civilians around the country for up to 22 days. they could face a 20% cut in their salary. you don't think that will impact on our economy? you don't think that's going to impact on jobs? you don't think that's going to impact on our ability to recover from the recession? jon: mr. panetta also deliver ad stark warning about the scale and scope of cyber attacks on this country saying they could cripple the united states. >> we are literally the target of thousands of cyber attacks every day. every day. thousands of sigher about attacks t
that came out recently. it did suggest the pentagon is pushing the pentagon that would only keep 8000 troops in afghanistan. i know that general austin, you weren't a part of the process so far, but can you support a plan that was scheduled withdraws troops in advance? you know, we're looking at withdraws troops in afghanistan and according to this article from a passing down to 1000 within a short period of time, i have questions if we can even maintain our mission, let alone complete the mission. how can you make decisions on troop withdraw when sec previously, so much depends on the ground, what the government is doing, what variability eyes up to that point. how would you approach a proposal like that? >> i certainly would first really work hard to make sure i fully understood with the leadership wanted to get done moving into the future. certainly my advice is the commander on the ground or commander central command would provide my advice based upon breaking the security forces are and the conditions in theater and what i think we need to do to move forward to make sure we maintain the
103 different stem -- science, technologies, engineering and math -- programs within the pentagon alone. consolidating those would save $1.7 billion over the next ten years. these are programs that are not necessarily initiated by congress, by the way. so they do have the flexibility to make those changes. department of defense tuition assistance program totally duplicates our veterans tuition assistance program. so you can do in service have this access to tuition while in service and then have the identical tuition access afterwards and you can claim them both. there's nothing wrong with wanting togy an educational benefit to our troops, but we don't need to do it twice. that's a significant savings of $4.5 billion. alternative energy. we have a department of energy. their whole goal is to work on alternative energy and renewable energy and efficiency within energy. the department of defense is spending $700 million a year on research in alternative energy that totally duplicates everything we're doing everywhere else. so there's $00700 million that we should not be spending at
%, and defense is that 13%. i would like to give them the tools at the pentagon to manage through this and make sure that readiness does not suffer. host: we are talking with representative matt salmon, republican from arizona. larry, rutledge, georgia, you are on the air. independent line. caller: i think they should get bob woodward and a are -- ar-16. the marsupial press cannot seem to get the president back in their pouch. maybe we could cut the program for the cloning of joe biden because we do not need stupid and stereo. thank you, sir. host: that was larry in georgia. this is the white house's take on the sequester in arizona -- $18 million lost in primary and secondary education. guest: i think if the president spent even one-third more time leading, we would probably be able to do the job that needs to be done as far as targeting specific cuts like four point $5 billion on him proper food stamp payments, or an unused airport and -- in oklahoma, $340,000 for robust squirrels. i could go on and on about the ridiculous spending. if the president would work with us and talk to harry reid i
federal government except the pentagon. all of a sudden the last couple of months hitting this arbitrary political target is vital. what is vital, as i said, is having a deficit strategy that's consistent with sound economic growth and making sure that we strengthen the middle class and that means as a first step to make sure that our deficits, as the economy improves, as we grow, that our deficits are not growing faster than g.d.p. and that we stabilize the debt as a percentage of g.d.p. because if you don't, as the economy improves, higher government borrowing -- we need to adopt that strategy and adopt it now. have it kicked in over a period of time. we just got very good news that the rate of per capita increase in health care costs is actually at the lowest level of 50 years. we need to continue to adopt strategies to keep that -- those costs increase low. as as demographic changes means baby boomers retire and we clearly need to keep working on those issues. but let me just sum up where we are in terms of our deficit reduction targets. over the last little over two years we have no
cain and people who don't want -- it sounds like rhetoric, literally don't want the post filled at the pentagon because of their grudges. >> julian, the senate will take up mr. hagel's nomination when it reconvenes in ten days atime but i want to bring in something from richard hass. here he is with our own joe scarborough. >> we're hearing in the end most likely he's going to pass and be secretary of defense, so why hold him up over a recess when the pentagon desperately needs somebody at the helm? >> because in a funny sort of way, joe, it's exactly what mccain said. it's a way of getting their pound of flesh. >> julian, pound of flesh. is that really what this is all about? given that our troops deserve a leader because they serve with every ounce of their bodies, they give their bodies. >> well, i don't know that they will get a pound of flesh and it is a rizable reason. politics is about picking good fights. this is a fight the republicans will lose and it's a bad fight and you wonder why after what's happened to the republican party they continue to pick bad fights they're going to lose.
jennifer griffin live from the pentagon with more on that. >> reporter: today the deputy defense secretary, jon, warned by the end of the year two-thirds of all army units will not be ready to fight other wars, and there won't be enough money to put out to sea a third of the navy ships. the warning comes one day after the pentagon told congress it is going to have to furlough half of its 800,000-civilian workers. the hardest-hit states, california and virginia. our team went to hampton roads, virginia, yesterday. tom taylor owns a ship repair business there. >> it's not like turning on a spigot. you don't turn it on, turn it off, you know? if it's canceled, these things are months or years in the planning stage, so if they are canceled, you know, they don't come right back, you know? so that's pretty alarming. >> i want to know when am i looking -- am i getting laid off in march or april? you're one of those people who are living paycheck to paycheck, then you're, you have no secondary plan, and that's going to be horrible, it's going to cause a lot of stress. >> i'm very concerned about t
get it worse? i worked in the pentagon. it would have made it a lot better. so we realized you really have to go after the people who do the work, people who do logistics, communications, pass information, do car bombs, you have to take those out. we came up with a strategy, philadelphia would love this. it is like rocky balboa and apollo creed. we'll hit them in the midsection and hit them a lot. from august of 2004 when we did 18 raids, two years, later, same month, same force, same fight, we were doing 300 raids a month. that was ten a night. now, if you stop and you say, well, ten a night, that's a lot, that's impressive. that means every raid guy on the force is going on a raid at least one raid every night. every pilot's flying one or 2:00 raids every night. and these raids are not patrols. this is not with foot, these are going in the door, somebody is getting shot. extraordinary, and to do that though you can't use previous systems. one you've got to be able to bring in this intelligence on an industrial scale. you have got to be able -- we got to the point where instead of th
effect. the pentagon needs a seasoned leader to diplomat these cuts, cuts for which an overwhelmingly majority of republicans in congress voted. the so-called sequester, mr. president, was supported by 174 republicans in the house of representatives, 28 republicans here in the senate, 60% and 75% of the two republican bodies in this country. we have a balanced proposal to replace those across-the-board cuts for this year with smart spending reductions which must continue, a measure to close corporate tax loopholes and wasteful subsidies. and revenue from the wealthiest among us, americans making millions of dollars each year. it's critical that the republicans and democrats come together to find a balanced way to avert these drastic cuts. the consequence of the so-called sequester cuts are real not only for national defense but for millions of american families and businesses alike. three-quarters of a million jobs, 750,000 jobs, mr. president, are at stake. across the country tens of thousands of teachers, including thousands of workers with disabled children would be laid off. 70,00
for the pentagon and cia unless the white house stops what he calls stone walling. i'm john roberts. hour number two of america's news headquarters live from the nation's capital starts right now. let's go to steve centanni who has been following the story of senator graham. good afternoon. >> good afternoon, john. talk this morning that there was talk on the is sunday talk shows that two important are nominations can be held up until the white house answers more questions about benghazi. during the attack in benghazi senator lindsey graham wants to know whether the president reached out personally to libyan leaders. he said the nomination of chuck hagel and john brennan could be side tracked until senators get the answers they want. while stopping short of supporting a filibuster graham has serious concerns about whether the president did enough to stop that attack that killed four americans. >> i do believe if he had picked up the phone, called the libyan government, these folks could have is gotten out of the airport to the annex and the last two guys may very well be alive and if he did cal
a vast network of old colleagues throughout the pentagon bureaucracy. is reaching out to them. he deliberately forms a back channel. he cultivates this woman in the white house named meghan o'sullivan who was president bush's chief adviser on iraq in the national security council. he sees she's waving from the policy, he cultivates her. they're talking on the phone practically every day. now, picture this. this is kind of average. his petraeus, a three-star general in fort leavenworth. is talking on the phone everyday with the senior advisor to the president of united states. she will be asking him, general casey who is a four-star general actually commanding troop in iraq if general casey as we only need one more brigade, what do you think with an petraeus would muster these arguments that she could funnel to her seniors on why this really isn't enough. so, you know, when he comes to washington and meets in restaurants -- by the way, this is not, this is strictly professional. can you imagine, this is someone, essentially subverting the chain of command, getting his own views acr
it is and the republicans is to walk a fine line here. they're concerned what happens to the pentagon under sequestration because it goes across the board, they can't kill one program, every department, every subset has to feel the pain and so they're cautious on this point, but really, when you talk to them and you get them to say. and give them a choice between what the president is pitching and done in an unpleasant way they'd still rather have the cuts. >> he talks about, stu, look, we can avoid the cuts if we come up with a balanced program and all i'm asking for from the republicans is reasonable tax reform. that's it. we'll close a couple of loopholes, only the rich will feel that and the republicans are so married to the rich that they can't even save the lives of human beings and the jobs of first responders because they're so opposed to tax reform and the journal has questions about his definition of tax reform. your thoughts on that. >> yes, he has changed what tax reform means. tax reform, to the republicans, up until the last election. tax reform was, lower tax rates. get rid of some deducti
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 89 (some duplicates have been removed)

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